A bit of irony: HEPATITIS B VACCINATION

The following comes from the NDDIC (The National Digestive Diseases Information Clearinghouse, a service of the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK), and part of the National Institutes of Health under the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.

First, they state:

"Hepatitis B spreads by contact with an infected person's blood, semen, or other body fluid."

They continue, 

"You could get hepatitis B by:

  • having sex with an infected person without using a condom,
  • sharing drug needles,
  • getting a tattoo or body piercing with dirty tools that were used on someone else,
  • getting pricked with a needle that has infected blood on it (health care workers can get hepatitis B this way),
  • sharing a toothbrush or razor with an infected person,
  • being born to a woman who has hepatitis B or through her breast milk."

And,

"You can NOT get hepatitis B by ...

  • shaking hands with an infected person,
  • hugging an infected person,
  • sitting next to an infected person."

The CDC (Centers for Disease Control & Prevention, www.cdc.gov ) lists the following as prime candidates for the Hepatitis B vaccination:

"High-risk populations:

  • People with multiple sex partners and those who have been recently diagnosed with a sexually transmitted disease.
  • Sex partners and household contacts of HBV carriers.
  • Men who have sex with men.
  • Household contacts of children adopted from countries with high rates of hepatitis B.
  • Injection drug users.
  • Travelers to countries with high rates of hepatitis B (staying longer than 6 months).
  • People with occupational exposure to blood.
  • Clients and staff in institutions for the developmentally disabled.
  • Patients with chronic kidney failure (including those on chronic hemodialysis).
  • Patients receiving clotting factor concentrates.
  • Inmates of long-term correctional facilities."
Therefore, routine vaccination as follows is mandated:

All infants, children, and adolescents. The hepatitis B vaccine is given through three shots. All babies should get the vaccine. Infants get the first shot within 12 hours after birth. They get the second shot at age 1 to 2 months and the third shot between ages 6 and 18 months. Older children and adults can get the vaccine, too. They get three shots over 6 months. Children who have not had the vaccine should get it.

HOW DO THE VAST MAJORITY OF PRISTINE, 0 TO 12 HOUR OLD INFANTS RELATE IN ANY WAY TO THE "AT RISK" PROFILES DEFINED ABOVE BY THE CDC AND NDDIC ?????!!!!!!!!!

Here are some articles you should read before allowing your newborn to be injected with the hepatitis B vaccine.

http://www.mercola.com/2002/jan/23/hepatitis_vaccine.htm - Local link if mercola.com is unavailable

 



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